Applied Imagination Principles And Procedures Of Creative Thinking Pdf

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Applied Imagination

By Alex Osborn. Civilization, itself, is the product of creative thinking. In some centuries, his imagination has made life on this planet an intense practice of all the lovelier energies. Doctor James Harvey Robinson went even further, saying: "Were it not for slow, painful, and constantly discouraged creative effort , man would be no more than a species of primate living on seeds, fruit, roots, and uncooked flesh. No one will ever know to whom we should erect monuments for such indispensable discoveries as the use of fire.

That and another creative triumph, the wheel, both came out of the Stone Age. The main use of the wheel up until 1, A. Then someone had the idea of using it as a back-saver in the form of a water wheel. By the time William the Conqueror took over England, over 5, mills in that tiny country were driven by water power.

It was imagination, said Victor Wagner, that enabled man to extend his thumb by inventing the vise—to strengthen his fist and arm by inventing the hammer. A Yale professor has estimated that—thanks to the machines which have been created by man—the average person now has available to him a work power equal to the muscle power of slaves. That such progress can continue, Charles F. Kettering, for one, feels certain: Every time you tear a leaf off a calendar you present a new place for new ideas and progress.

It was only about years ago that Europe began to rate the power of thinking, and especially creative thinking, on a par with the power of brute force.

It was this new attitude that gave vitality to the Renaissance. Without doubt, our new heights in standard of living have been reached through creative thinking. One new idea inherited by America from England was a way to use fire by means of an internal combustion engine.

For it, alone, gives gainful occupation to over 7,, of us. Farming employs only 9,,, including farm families as well as hired hands. Agricultural ideas have made far richer the rich soil of our country. The creative genius poured into farm machinery by the McCormicks and the Deeres has enabled each farm hand to turn out far more food than formerly. When America was young, it took 19 farmers to feed one city dweller. Today 19 farmers produce enough food for themselves and for 66 other people.

And yet, it is only recently that the value of imagination has been fully recognized even in America. And the Aluminum Company has recently adopted a newly coined word, imagineering, which means that you let your imagination soar and then engineer it down to earth.

Thus, competition has forced American business to recognize the importance of conscious creative effort. So much so, that, more and more, the heart and center of almost every successful manufacturing company is its creative research. Industrial research used to do but little more than take things apart in order to find out what caused what and why. The new research adds to such fact-finding a definite and conscious creative function aimed to discover new facts, arrive at new combinations, find new applications.

Thanks to thinkers like Doctor James B. But, alas, the newest and most pressing problems of our nation are not so much the improvement of things as the solution of people -problems. Overshadowing all such is our international impasse. We are applying plenty of research to this, but in the ineffective form of merely finding facts and making diagnoses. In discussing this with David Lawrence, he remarked:. The interesting fact was this. All the writers devoted some time to analyzing the causes of the situation and very intelligently, too, although all did not agree.

However, once they had made such an analysis, they seemed to have expended their energy. The creative spark so badly needed was sadly lacking. The fundamental issue of our time, said Raymond Fosdick, is whether we can develop understanding and wisdom reliable enough to serve as a chart in working out the problems of human relations. He recommended more research; and, undoubtedly, there should be more scientific study to clarify our public problems.

But investigations cannot find solutions unless implemented with ideas. We would have failed in our atomic research if our scientists had not thought beyond the facts and beyond the known techniques. It was the new techniques they thought up, and the countless hypotheses they dreamed up, which solved the atom.

In every community, there is a crying need for more creative thinking. Scores of municipal problems are begging for ideas—city-planning and traffic safety, for instance. In New York, Robert Moses has shown what imagination can do. William Zeckendorf has likewise endowed New York City with ideas.

Some of his brainstorms may never work out, such as the city within itself in downtown Manhattan with a roof so large that it would serve as another La Guardia Field. He also thought up the new dream-town which has been created on the lower East Side to house the vast population of the United Nations Organization.

John D. Rockefeller, Jr. In traffic problems, ideas can save lives. My home town of Buffalo has been constantly rated by the National Safety Council as at, or near, the top of all large cities in prevention of traffic deaths. This record is mainly due to the creative thinking of the volunteer head of the local safety setup, a manufacturer named Wade Stevenson. One new idea was to dramatize the virtue of good driving.

Instead of handing out summonses, the police handed out flowers. On one evening, Patrolmen William Collins and James Kelly ordered 25 women drivers to the curb, then complimented them on their careful driving and handed them fresh orchids.

To make democracy work as it should, it is vital to get out the vote. Pontiac, Michigan, adopted a new idea to that end. All the churches of that city rang their bells simultaneously once an hour while the polls were open on election day. There is hardly a phase of national life which does not cry for improvement; and in nearly every case, the key is more and better creative thinking.

Take the baffling problem of labor and capital, for instance. The solution is not yet in sight, said U. Senator Irving Ives, "but if we would put half the effort into thinking up ideas for straightening out our labor snarl as we put into finding facts , we could save years in bringing order out of our industrial chaos.

The problem of taxation is therefore vital. Why is it that we have so long stumbled from one expedient to another instead of creating a long-term plan of sound taxation? In our national problems, we need the best thinking of our most creative people. Some of them are occasionally invited by Washington to lend a hand, especially in wartime.

During the first World War, Thomas Edison was called in, not to contribute his scientific knowledge, but to think up how to save the farmers: It was he who suggested the plan which, in substance, became the ever-normal granary. Why does Washington make so little use of our creative citizens in peacetime?

One reason is that too much power of judgment is asked of them—judicial ability which is impossible without a deeper knowledge of the subject than can be quickly acquired. Why not ask such creative minds to perform a creative function only? Why not divide each problem so that one set of experienced experts will take care of the fact-finding and judicial judgment, while the creative consultants will concentrate solely on suggesting idea upon idea?

No matter how many good ideas we may think up to solve our problems on the local and national levels, we may still be lost unless we are creatively sharp enough to cut our international knot. One great challenge is how to ingratiate America to the rest of the world.

Ideas will have to be fought with ideas, said Ernest Hauser. In our attempt to hold the line against Russia in Europe, we have not even begun to use ideological weapons. If Drew Pearson had relied upon legislators and bureaucrats to bless his Friendship Train, that idea of his would probably have died a-borning.

But he went ahead on his own and, almost singlehanded, showed how America can shower gifts in a way that can make foreign recipients recognize our generosity and appreciate our donations.

The Dunkirk idea was another hopeful example. This latter-day miracle, wrote Meyer Berger, originated in this smoke-blackened city on stormy Lake Erie. It spread with astonishing swiftness to cities all over the United States.

Dunkirk, N. Her little people established warm kinship with the little people of the North Sea Dunkerque. Americans in other states looked upon this sisterhood and found it somehow heart-filling and genuine.

They moved toward similar adoptions. The Dunkirk idea was a project which our Federal Government might well have done something about—not by way of taking it over, but by way of sponsorship. While at war, Washington rightly helps to organize local volunteer bond-selling campaigns throughout the country.

Just so, our government might well put its weight behind a movement like this, which, if multiplied nationally, could build more friendships in Europe than billions of dollars shoveled out of our treasury in cold-blooded routine. The Friendship Train, the Miracle of Dunkirk—these are models of what we need, and there is hope that more and more will come. For example, why not have naturalized Americans write home to their families in Europe and tell them the truth about America? This idea was put into action by millions of our citizens to help keep Italy from bowing to Moscow in the election.

The most effective inspirer of letters, according to Drew Pearson, was Generoso Pope, the Italian-American newspaper publisher in New York, who organized letter-writing clubs and committees among Italian-Americans throughout the United States. He estimates that over 2,, letters were written to Italy alone. Equally effective can be letters written to the countries just inside the Iron Curtain. Why not seek suggestions from amateurs for our cold war just as we sought them for our last World War?

Or why not set up a group of creative people in the State Department with just one function—to suggest new ways and more ways to win the friendship of the rest of the world?

All week long this group could sit and pile up alternatives. In some such way we need to put more creative power to work on our international problems.

Creative problem solving: past, present, future

Scientific Research An Academic Publisher. Osborn, A. Applied imagination: Principles and procedures of creative thinking 3rd ed. Doak , Stacey M. Jambura , Jason A. Knittel , Audrey C.

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By Alex Osborn. Civilization, itself, is the product of creative thinking. In some centuries, his imagination has made life on this planet an intense practice of all the lovelier energies. Doctor James Harvey Robinson went even further, saying: "Were it not for slow, painful, and constantly discouraged creative effort , man would be no more than a species of primate living on seeds, fruit, roots, and uncooked flesh. No one will ever know to whom we should erect monuments for such indispensable discoveries as the use of fire.

Skip to search form Skip to main content You are currently offline. Some features of the site may not work correctly. Osborn Published Psychology. Follow up what we will offer in this article about applied imagination principles and procedures of creative thinking. You know really that this book is coming as the best seller book today.

Explore a new genre. Burn through a whole series in a weekend. Let Grammy award-winning narrators transform your commute. Broaden yourhorizons with an entire library, all your own. Tags: Applied Imagination - Principles and Procedures of Creative Writing by Alex Osborn Free download, audio books, books to read, good books to read, cheap books, good books, online books, books online, book reviews, read booksonline, books to read online, online library, greatbooks to read, best books to read, top books to read Applied Imagination - Principles and Procedures of Creative Writing by Alex Osborn books to read online.

Applied Imagination - Principles and Procedures of Creative Writing

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You've discovered a title that's missing from our library. Can you help donate a copy? Open Library is a project of the Internet Archive , a c 3 non-profit. See more about this book on Archive. Brainstorming is a group or individual creativity technique by which efforts are made to find a conclusion for a specific problem by gathering a list of ideas spontaneously contributed by its member s. Osborn claimed that brainstorming was more effective than individuals working alone in generating ideas, although more recent research has questioned this conclusion.

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  1. Reniktokerb1997

    Follow up what we will offer in this article about applied imagination principles and procedures of creative thinking. You know really that this book is coming as.

  2. Sumner J.

    Applied imagination. principles and procedures of creative thinking. by Osborn, Alex F., Alex F. Osborn. ; 2 Ratings; Want to read; 10 Currently.

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